Beyond Gallipoli and Anzac Day

MARTIN BAYER: International Remembrance of the First World War

Monday 22 October at 5.30 for 6pm

11 Tasmania Circuit, Forrest, ACT.

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10, non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/YRJE

Martin-Bayer-300x386Martin Bayer is a German-born photographer and independent scholar of war serving on an Australian-German research group on First World War commemoration. This talk will discuss differing modes of commemorating that war in various countries and will consider the Australian experience as part of a wider narrative arc examining the international perspective on commemorations.                     

Speaker: Martin Bayer holds a Master of Peace and Security Policy Studies (IFSH/University of Hamburg, Germany) and a BA in War Studies (King’s College London, UK) and besides his vocational education as photographer (Lette-Verein Berlin, Germany). He is author of a First World War centenary study for the German Federal Foreign Office, Not just on Flanders Fields – The First World War as Topic of International Cultures of Commemoration.

Under the label www.wartist.org, he gives lectures on topics such as the cultural dimensions of war and organises art exhibitions, such as Landscapes and Memory at the Bavarian Army Museum, Ingolstadt. In 2015-2018, he took part in an Australian-German research group on the contemporary commemoration of the First World War (ADFA/University of New South Wales/Freie Universität Berlin).

His exhibition Germany’s Dead: War, Grief, and Remembrance with photos of German First World War memorials can be seen at the Australian War Memorial, Saunders Gallery, from 5 Oct to 2 Dec 2018.

 

Manning Clark House – annual Day of Ideas

Sunday, 11 November, 2018

10am start

$50 MCH members, $35 concession, $65 non-members

We expect places to book out fast, so you can book early at https://www.trybooking.com/YQWH

Day of Ideas

The Day of Ideas will look at two significant events on 11 November, 57 years apart – namely the end of World War One and The Dismissal. A programme outlining the speakers and topics for the day will be issued shortly. Expert speakers will include Professor Nicholas Brown, Professor Jenny Hocking, Andrew Clark and more …

One hundred years ago – on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918 – World War One, ‘the war to end all wars,’ ended. Australia lost more than 60,000 soldiers in a conflict largely fought at the other end of the world.

Exactly 57 years later – on November 11, 1975 – the Governor General, Sir John Kerr, sacked Labor Prime Minister Gough Whitlam. Some labelled his action a constitutional coup; at the very least it was a politically lethal Vice Regal ambush against an elected Labor Government. Both events are decades apart; one lasted four years and cost 20 million lives, while the other was over in the space of a few minutes.

For Australians, however, both are linked by more than just a coincidence of dates. World War One was followed by the worst sectarian divide in Australia’s history, partly caused by the bitterness and rancor surrounding the issue of conscription, and this divide was later exacerbated by the terrible economic slump known as the Great Depression.

The Dismissal also left a deep scar in Australian public life. The Australian soldiers’ heroism in the Gallipoli campaign in 1915 was hailed as the arrival of a distinctive Australian nationalism, but nearly 60 years later The Dismissal raised fundamental questions about the nature and direction of that Australian nation.

Since then, there has been debate about a possible future switch from the British monarch, or the Monarch’s representative in Australia, as the head of state, to having a President of the Australian republic, helping Australians to accept their future as a country in the Indo-Pacific region.

The shaping influence of these two key events, and what we should do as Australians to make this a better society, will be addressed in the Manning Clark House Day of Ideas, which will be held on November 11.

 

 

 

2018 Dymphna Clark Lecture – Clare Wright’s ‘You Daughters of Freedom’

Wednesday 17 October at 7.00pm

RN Robertson Lecture Theatre, Building 46, ANU

MCH members, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $20

Non-members $25.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/YJQM

 september 9, 2019 _ 2_00 pm _ findlay residence(1)

Clare Wright’s new book, You Daughters of Freedom, brings to life a time when Australian democracy was the envy of the world—and the standard bearer for progress in a shining new century. For the ten years from 1902, when Australia’s feminist activists won the vote for white women, the world looked to this trailblazing young democracy for inspiration.

This epic new history tells the story of that victory—and of Australia’s role in the subsequent international struggle—through the eyes of five remarkable players: the redoubtable Vida Goldstein, the flamboyant Nellie Martel, indomitable Dora Montefiore, daring Muriel Matters, and the artist Dora Meeson Coates, who painted the controversial Australian banner carried in the British feminist activist marches of 1908 and 1911.           

 Speaker:  La Trobe University historian Associate Professor Clare Wright has worked as an author, academic, political speech-writer, historical consultant, and radio and TV broadcaster. Her earlier book, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, won the 2014 Stella Prize and the 2014 NIB Award for Literature and was shortlisted for many other awards.

 

Australia’s Intelligence Agencies and the Brave New World of Home Affairs: how we got there and how it matters

Wednesday 19 September at 5.30 for 6pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/XPAP

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In December 2017 the Department of Home Affairs was created, assuming many functions from the Attorney General’s Department, including national security policy and coordination, criminal law and law enforcement.

The functions it took over from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet included cyber- and counter terrorism policy coordination, and the new department absorbed the whole of the former Department of Immigration and Border Protection.

Professor Blaxland will discuss the implications of these administrative re-arrangements for Australia’s intelligence agencies.

About the speaker:  John Blaxland is Professor of International Security and Intelligence Studies at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, ANU. He is a lead author in the three-volume official history of ASIO, having authored Volume II, The Protest Years, 1963-75 (Allen & Unwin 2015), and co-authored The Secret Cold War, 1975-89 (2016).  John has also published works on the intervention in East Timor, the Australian Army, and on counterinsurgency. He makes regular appearances in the print and electronic media as a commentator on intelligence and security matters.

 

 

The problem of justice – Prosecuting Japanese for War Crimes after the Second World War

22 August 5.30 for 6pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/WYXH

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After the Second World War in the Asia and the Pacific, the victorious Allied powers prosecuted thousands of Japanese military personnel for war crimes.

The scale of atrocities during the war had been remarkable, but pinning responsibility on specific individuals proved to be more difficult than expected. As a result, some of the justice was rough and ready.

About the speaker: Robert Cribb is Professor of Asian History at the Australian National University. His research focuses on Indonesia, especially issues of national identity, mass violence, environmental politics and historical geography. He has also researched the histories of Japan, Mongolia, Korea and Myanmar. His most recent book, with Sandra Wilson, Beatrice Trefalt and Dean Aszkielowicz, is Japanese War Criminals: the politics of Justice after the Second World War (Columbia 2017), which won the New South Wales Premier’s History Award in the General History category. He is also author of Wild Man from Borneo: a cultural history of the orangutan (Hawai’i 2014, with Helen Gilbert and Helen Tiffin) and the Historical Atlas of Indonesia (Curzon 2000). He is currently working with Sandra Wilson to explain Japanese war crimes in Southeast Asia during the Second World War.

 

Absolute Power – the pope in the modern world

Speaker: author Paul Collins

13 September 5.30 for 6pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) & full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/WSPO

BookPaulCollinsThis is the remarkable story of the last two centuries of the papacy. In 1799, the papacy was at rock bottom: The Papal States had been swept away, Rome had been seized by the Revolutionary French armies, and the cardinals were scattered across Europe. With the next papal election uncertain, it seemed that even if Catholicism survived, the papacy was doomed. And yet, just over 200 years later, the pope’s influence reaches across the world—from Cuban politics to gender equality to the refugee crisis.

Speaker: Paul Collins is an historian, broadcaster and writer. A Catholic priest for thirty-three years, he resigned from the active priestly ministry in 2001 due to a dispute with the Vatican over his book Papal Power (1997). He is the author of fifteen books, the most recent of which is Absolute Power. How the pope became the most influential man in the world (New York: Public Affairs, 2018). A former head of the religion and ethics department in the ABC, he is well known as a commentator on Catholicism and the papacy and has a strong interest in ethics, environmental and population issues. He has a Master’s degree in theology (Th.M.) from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in history from the Australian National University. He lives in Canberra.

Dead Right – how neoliberalism ate itself and what comes next

Author Richard Denniss in discussion with Genevieve Jacobs

31 July 5.30 for 6pm

 Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/WWGW

Dr Richard Denniss is the Chief Economist and former Executive Director of The Australia Institute. He is a prominent Australian economist, author and public policy commentator, and a former Adjunct Associate Professor in the Crawford School of Public Policy at the Australian National University.

Denniss is the author of best-selling Quarterly Essay, Dead Right: How neoliberalism ate itself and what comes next. In Dead Right, Richard explores what neoliberalism has done to Australian society, looks at ways to renew our democracy and discusses everything from the fragmenting Coalition to an idea of the national interest that goes beyond economics.

Genevieve Jacobs has been a journalist for 30 years, working in print and radio. She is the former ABC Mornings presenter and works with a wide range of organisations including the National Folk Festival, Canberra International Music Festival, M16 artspace and Conflict Resolution Service. She has just completed co-chairing the consultative committee for the ACT’s first Reconciliation Day public holiday. Genevieve has an enduring interest in building and strengthening community engagement.

MCH Poetry

Thursday, June 28, 2018.

Venue – MCH, 11 Tasmania Circle, ACT.

Drinks and nibbles 7 pm — Readings 7.30-9.30 pm.

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READERS:

Jacqui Malins is a poet, performer and artist. She has featured at poetry events in Canberra, Sydney and Newcastle. Jacqui is also the co-founder and organiser of Mother Tongue Multilingual Poetry events in Canberra. In March and April this year, Jacqui curated the public program delivered by Tuggeranong Arts Centre for the exhibition ‘Another Day in Paradise’, featuring the artwork of Myuran Sukumaran. Cavorting with Time, the script of the performance work of the same name, was released by Recent Work Press and Ampersand Duck in 2018.

Martin Dolan is a Canberra poet who has been writing and publishing for twenty-five years. He has given up moonlighting as a public servant to pursue a PhD candidature in creative writing at the University of Canberra. Martin’s latest book of poetry is Peripheral Vision, released this year by Recent Work Press.

Shane Strange works in the Creative Writing program at the University of Canberra, and as publisher at Recent Work Press, a small press imprint based in the ACT, Australia. It publishes poetry,  non fiction, and other short-form textual work. Recent Work Press aims to make all its work available in attractive, paperback editions, priced to make good work.

 

 

 

Secret City: Fact, fiction and Australian politics

Speaker : Chris Uhlmann

7-11 Barry Drive Teaching Centre, Australian National University (TBC)

7pm – 12 July 2018

Members $20 (MCH members or govt support concession, full-time students).

Non-members $25

Book here 

The Prime Minister likes to paraphrase Mark Twain saying, “only fiction has to be credible”. Perhaps that’s because he has lived through the incredible last decade of Australian politics.

In 2008 Kevin Rudd was in his first year as PM, enjoying a 70 per cent approval rating and, apparently, settling in for a long run. In November that year, Barack Obama was elected President of the United States and America looked like it would finally become the land it imagined itself to be.

What went wrong? Come and find out the details, insights and perspectives!

About the speaker: Chris Uhlmann is a leading Australian political journalist. After many years working for the ABC, in August 2017, Uhlmann moved to Nine News replacing Laurie Oakes. He had previously held the positions of the political editor for the 7.30 report, 14th presenter of AM for ABC radio and ABC News political editor. In 2008, Uhlmann received the Walkley Award for Broadcast Interviewing. With Steve Lewis, Uhlmann has written a series of political novels set in Canberra: The Marmalade Files (2012), The Mandarin Code (2014) and The Shadow Game (2016). These feature a political reporter, Harriet Dunkley, investigating a conspiracy involving China, the USA and Australian security organisations. In 2016 the first two books were adapted as the Australian television series Secret City.

Poetry evening

Thursday, May 24, 2018

7pm for 7.30 start

11 Tasmania Circuit, Forrest ACT 2603

$10 includes nibbles and wine

Contact Hazel Hall – hazelsshall@gmail.com

A reminder about Manning Clark Poetry this month. It should be a packed night!

Kathleen Bleakley (Wollongong). Kathleen Bleakley lives with her partner – in life and art – ‘pling, between the escarpment and the sea, in Wollongong. She has three collections (with Ginninderra Press) – Azure, (2017) Lightseekers, photography by ‘pling, (2015). and jumping out of cars, with Andrea Gawthorne, images by ‘pling, (2004).

Alison Thompson (Berry). Alison Thompson lives on the south coast of NSW and is a member of the Kitchen Table Poets. Her poems have been published here and overseas. She has published a chapbook Slow Skipping  (PressPress). Alison won the DPP Byron Bay Writers Festival Poetry prize (2011) and the 2016 Poetry d’Amour Love Poem Contest.

Chris Mansell (Berry). Among Chris Mansell’s latest publications are Verge,  Stung, Stung More, Spine Lingo, and Schadenvale Road.  Seven Stations (a song cycle with music by Andrew Batt-Rawden) was released by Hospital Hill on CD. Chris won the Queensland Premier’s Award for Poetry, Amelia Chapbook Award (USA) and the Meanjin Dorothy Porter Poetry Prize and has been short-listed for the National Book Council Award and the NSW Premier’s Award. Her site is chrismansell.com.

Australia without the US Alliance

Wednesday 23 May 5.30 for 6pm

 Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/VTLA

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Australia has long depended on America, not just for our own defence but for the security of our wider neighbourhood and the maintenance of a stable order in Asia. For much of the time that has worked, on balance, quite well for Australia. But in recent years our dependence on America has grown while America has for many reasons become less and less dependable either as an ally or as a guarantor of regional stability. So today Australia has to look very carefully at the challenges America now faces in Asia and the risks and benefits to us of depending on it in future as we have done in the past. And we have to ask anew what the alternatives to such dependence might look like.

Speakers: Professor Hugh White and Professor Joan Beaumont

Hugh White is Professor of Strategic Studies at the Australian National University. He has worked on Australian strategic, defence and foreign policy issues since 1980.

Joan Beaumont is an Emeritus Professor at the Australian National University. She specialises in the history of Australian foreign policy and the Australian experience of war.

 

The UN Nuclear Ban Treat

Thursday, 3 May 2018  —   5.30 for 6pm start

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest, ACT

MCH members, concession (govt support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15

BOOK HERE

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Speaker: Professor Ramesh Thakur is Director of the Centre for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (CNND) in the Crawford School, The Australian National University and co-Convenor of the Asia-Pacific Leadership Network for Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament (APLN).

He was Vice Rector and Senior Vice Rector of the United Nations University (and Assistant Secretary-General of the United Nations) from 1998–2007.

Educated in India and Canada, he was a Professor of International Relations at the University of Otago in New Zealand and Professor and Head of the Peace Research Centre at the Australian National University, during which time he was also a consultant/adviser to the Australian and New Zealand governments on arms control, disarmament and international security issues.

He was a Commissioner and one of the principal authors of The Responsibility to Protect (2001), and Senior Adviser on Reforms and Principal Writer of the United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s second reform report (2002).

He was a Professor of Political Science at the University of Waterloo (2007–11), Distinguished Fellow of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (2007–10) and Foundation Director of the Balsillie School of International affairs in Waterloo, Ontario.

 

 

 

1917 : a revolution against Das Kapital?

Speaker : Humphrey McQueen

23 April 2018, 5.30 for 6pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest

 MCH members, concession and full-time students $10 (non members $15)

BOOK HERE

humphrey-mcqueen[1]Responding to Antonio Gramsci’s 1919 suggestion, the talk will weave together a trio of anniversaries:

  • 150 years since the publication of Das Kapital in September 1867
  • the 200th anniversary of the birth of its author, Karl Marx, on 5 May 1818
  •  the centenary of the Bolshevik Revolution, erupting in October 1917.

Speaker: Humphrey McQueen is a Canberra-based historian and activist at work on yet one more Marxist account of the origins of capital, to be titled The Revolution Inside Capital.

For access to a selection of his writings over fifty years, see www.surplusvalue.org.au

 

Down by Dymphna’s Garden

Sunday March 25th —– 4.00 to 6.00 pm
Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest

It’s FREE to come along and enjoy – please book here

Devonshire Tea can be purchased on the day.

Sow the seeds for the renewal of Dymphna Clark’s 1950’s kitchen garden.

Join us for an afternoon of live music, Devonshire Tea and gardening presentations.

Thanks to an ACT Government Community Garden Grant, the old kitchen garden site at Manning Clark House will be refurbished as a community asset.

Join us for a short presentation from our soil and compost experts Mr Gerry Gillespie and Dr Amardeep Wander.

Then enjoy songs, including from the Australian composer Penelope Thwaites AM,
sung by exceptional soloists with a repertoire not often heard in
our city:

❀ Kenneth Goodge -Tenor
❀ Hannah Belnick – Soprano
❀ Rudie Darby – Soprano

❀ Fleur Millar – Conductor
❀ Sam Rowe – Pianist
❀ Manning Clark Choristers

Admission is free, although gold coin donations appreciated.

Whither the ABC

27 February 2018 – 5.30 for 6pm

 Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members, concession/full-time students $10, non-members $15.00

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

Whither the ABC – a panel discussion featuring Genevieve Jacobs (ex ABC), Jack Waterford (ex Canberra Times) and Ebony Bennett (Australia Institute) about the Australian Broadcasting Corporation which will end with questions and answers from the audience.

genevive.pngGenevieve Jacobs has been a print and radio journalist throughout her career and spent more than a decade working for the ABC in Canberra, most recently as the Mornings presenter. She works with a number of Canberra charities and not for profits and has an enduring interest in building and strengthening community engagement.

Ebony Bennett is the Deputy Director of Canberra-based think tank The Australia Institute and has worked in federal politics for more than a decade. Bennett has published research on gender and street harassment and regularly appears as a commentator on Sky News and as a contributor for the Guardian and Fairfax publications.

Jack Waterford is the former Editor-at-large at The Canberra Times and writes a regular column.

 

Author Richard Denniss and ABC presenter Genevieve Jacobs

Book title: Curing Affluenza

14 December, 5.30 for 6.30pm

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest, ACT

Members (and concession) $5, non-members $10

Click here to book

Richard Denniss will be talking about his latest book  ‘Curing Affluenza’ in conversation with Genevieve Jacobs of ABC radio.

‘Affluenza is that strange desire we feel to spend money we don’t have to buy things we don’t need to impress people we don’t know . . .’

Richard DennissA truly modern affliction, affluenza is endemic in Western societies, encouraged by those who profit from aculture of exploitation and waste.

So how do we cure ourselves?

In this sparkling book of ideas, Richard Denniss shows we must distinguish between consumerism, the love of buying things, which is undeniably harmful to us and the planet, and materialism, the love of things, which can in fact be beneficial.

We should cherish the things we own – preserve them, repair them, and then gift or sell them when we no longer need them. We must foster new ways of thinking and acting that do not squander limited resources and which support the things we value most – vibrant communities and rich experiences.

The book will be available and signed by the author. There will be plenty of time for discussion.

MCH 20th anniversary celebration

20th anniversary celebration

of Manning Clark House Inc.

Saturday
November 25 th
5.00 – 7.00 pm

Members $10, non-members $20

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

ImageMCHLowres#1Sebastian Clark invites you to join the MCH community for a couple of hours celebrating 20 years of Manning Clark House being established as an historic home for contemporary discussion and debate.

This will be a festive occasion in the gardens, with nibbles, drinks, an insightful overview of the last 20 years and an operatic performance by superb soloists and the Manning Clark House Choristers.

 

Poets Moya Pay and Sarah Rice

MCH Poetry Group

 23 November, 7 pm – $10 entry refreshments provided.

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest.

All welcome!

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Moya Pacey is a Canberra poet. The Wardrobe, her first collection, was a runner-up for the ACT Writers Centre Poetry Award in 2010.  In 2015, she published One Last Border: poetry for refugees with Hazel Hall and Sandra Renew (Ginninderra Press).   In 2017 Recent Work Press will publish her second collection.  She co-edits ‘Not Very Quiet’ an online poetry journal for women.

 

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Sarah Rice won the 2014 Ron Pretty and Bruce Dawe poetry prizes, co-won the 2013 Writing Ventures, and 2011 Gwen Harwood awards, and has been shortlisted in numerous others. Her art-book of poetry Those Who Travel (prints Patsy Payne) is held in the NGA and her collection, Fingertip of the Tongue, was published in September by UWAP this year.

Festival of Ideas – is democracy in Australia working?

Discussion, food and music – join us and have your say.

Saturday October 14th  

10.00 – 4.30 pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest

MCH members, government income support and full-time students $30. Non-members $40.00

 CLICK HERE TO BOOK

CLICK HERE FOR PROGRAM

The democratic experiment in countries around the world has been about the free contest of ideas, interests, and groups, along with tolerance for opponents and respect for their legitimacy. But the history of democracy globally is strewn with examples of extremists and demagogues manipulating prejudice, insecurity, and fear in a bid for power. Recent events in the United States of America and Europe suggest these examples are not relegated to history.

So how does Australia fare in this environment? Join us, and have your say as to whether democracy in Australia needs revamping and if so, what might we do about it?

Program covers presentations and discussion on:

  • what people think about our political parties
  • who controls the policy agenda
  • perspectives from different community groups
  • limitation of ideas covered in election campaigns
  • does French President Macron offer new approaches
  • what can we do to increase real democratic engagement.

 

Opportunity, merit and Australian democracy

13 October, 6.30 pm

The Muse Restaurant, East Hotel, 69 Canberra Avenue, Kingston

Dinner $90 per person OR Festival Ticket: 13-14 October Dinner and Day of Ideas, $110 (members) $120 (non-members)

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

Australians have prided themselves in the myth that opportunity is open for all. But the evidence that birth and luck play an outsized role in our lives is overwhelming. So how has the idea of a meritocracy survived for so long?

Join Professor Frank Bongiorno for fine dining at the Muse restaurant. For dinner, wine, and conversation with one of Australia’s most active public intellectuals on the future of opportunity and merit in Australia’s social democracy.

Speaker: Frank Bongiorno is Professor of History at the Australian National University. He is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian. His recent works include The Sex Lives of Australians: A History (2012), and The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia (2015)

North Korea Today and Tomorrow

Monday 9 October 2017, 5.30pm for 6pm 

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest

MCH members, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $5

Non-members $10.00

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

Dr Leonid Petrov is one of Australia’s leading experts on North Korea. In this talk he will summarise the domestic and international policies of Pyongyang and provide several possible scenarios for Korea and the region that include peaceful co-existence, violent unification and even a nuclear Armageddon.

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Leonid Petrov graduated from the Department of Oriental Studies, St. Petersburg State University in 1994, where he majored in Korean History and Language. In 1994-1996, he worked as interpreter for the South Korean National Soccer Team and participated in the 26th Olympic Games in Atlanta. In 1996-2002, Leonid Petrov worked on a doctoral thesis at the Australian National University. Between 2003 and 2005, Dr. Petrov conducted post-doctoral research at the Academy of Korean Studies in Seongnam and taught Korean History at the Intercultural Institute of California in San Francisco. In 2006-2007, he was Chair of Korean Studies at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) in Paris. Between 2009 and 2012, Dr. Petrov taught Korean History and Language at the University of Sydney. Currently, he teaches Cross-Cultural Management, Strategic Intelligence and other subjects at the International College of Management in Sydney (ICMS). Starting from 2007, Dr. Petrov has been involved in a number of projects sponsored by the Australian Research Council.

How does Australia decide to go to war – should the Parliament decide?

Speaker : Ernst Wilheim

Tuesday, 19 September – 5.30 for 6pm start. Finishes 7.30.

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest.

$5 for MCH members, government income support and full-time students, $10 non-members

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

The decision to go to war is arguably the most important decision any government can make. Yet it is the least regulated of any government decision.

We have all observed the many hours of parliamentary debate and back room negotiation on controversial legislation. Yet Australia can be taken to war on the whim of our Prime Minister.

How can this be?

Lawyers refer to ‘the Royal prerogative’ to go to war.

Is the Royal prerogative the relic of a bygone era? Is it consistent with contemporary values, with the modern perception of the role of the Parliament and the ultimate sovereignty of the people?  How do similar countries deal with the decision to go to the war? What are the alternatives? Is a requirement for prior parliamentary approval feasible? These are some of the issues to be explored.

Ernst Willheim is a Visiting fellow at the College of Law, ANU. Before his formal retirement he was a senior officer of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department. In that capacity, he has appeared as counsel in the High Court and other appellate courts, lead Australian delegations to international conferences, established and headed the Office of General Counsel and headed other legal policy divisions. Ernst has published widely on public law matters, constitutional law, administrative law, international law, refugee issues and indigenous issues. Ernst is Vice President of Manning Clark House.

 

 

New economic directions

The circular economy project of the European Union is a ground breaking initiative.      Questions are being asked whether mainstream economic policies in Australia are appropriate within a world of climate change impacts and growing inequality.

This forum will look at new economic directions including policies to redistribute income and address the imbalance between capital and labour.

Wednesday 9 August, 2017 – 5.30 for 6pm start. 7pm finish

Tickets – members/concessions $5, non-members $10. Click here to book. 

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circuit

Image of David Richardson - Australia Institute

David Richardson, The Australia Institute. David Richardson (BEc, MEc) taught at the University of New England and University of Western Australia. Worked in the Research Service, Parliamentary Library (1979-85 and 1996-2007). During the Hawke/Keating years (1985-1996) worked for Ministers Brian Howe and Sen Nick Bolkus. David commenced at The Australia Institute in 2008.

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Caroline Lambert is the  First Counsellor of the Delegation to Australia of the European Commission. Since March 2015, Caroline has been the European Union’s Climate and Environment Counsellor in Australia. Caroline worked for five years in the private office of the European Commissioner for Climate Action, Connie Hedegaard, where she advised on financial, trade and taxation matters and adaptation policy. Between 2007 and 2010, Caroline advised Margot Wallström, Vice President of the European Commission in charge of Communication and Interinstitutional Relations and helped design communication campaigns on key European policies.

Invidious Choices – naval war in the Pacific 1914

Speaker: Lieutenant Commander Desmond Woods
RANR Research Officer – Sea Power Centre – Australia – Department of Defence
Thursday 6 July 2017 at 6:00pm
Venue : Manning Clark House. 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest.
War in the Indo Pacific oceans and HMAS Australia in 1914 – Invidious Choices and catastrophe at Coronel and how the build up occurred and the details behind the scenes of how naval war began on this occasion and ended.
Ticket price $5.00 for MHC members, $10.00 for non-members

Click here to book

Organiser : Shobha Varkey
Ph: 0405064176

MCH Poetry – latest program

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Manning Clark House Program 2018 

Drinks and Nibbles: 7.00 pm

Readings 7.30-9.30 pm

Thursday 28 June
Recent Work Press Poets (Readings organised by Shane Strange)Jacqui Malins, Martin Dolan, Shane Strange.
Thursday 26 July
Limestone Tanka Poets (readings organised by Kathy Kituai).
Thursday 23 August
Russell Erwin (Goulburn) Penelope Layland (Canberra) Lizz Murphy (Binalong).
Thursday 27 September
To be announced.
Thursday 25 October
Paul Collis (Canberra) Jen Crawford (Canberra) Paul Magee (Canberra)
Thursday 22 November
Recent Work Press Poets (readings organised by Shane Strange)