Category Archives: Uncategorized

Poets Moya Pay and Sarah Rice

MCH Poetry Group

 23 November, 7 pm – $10 entry refreshments provided.

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest.

All welcome!

Poet_Moya_PaceyV1

Moya Pacey is a Canberra poet. The Wardrobe, her first collection, was a runner-up for the ACT Writers Centre Poetry Award in 2010.  In 2015, she published One Last Border: poetry for refugees with Hazel Hall and Sandra Renew (Ginninderra Press).   In 2017 Recent Work Press will publish her second collection.  She co-edits ‘Not Very Quiet’ an online poetry journal for women.

 

Poet_Sarah_RiceCrop

 

 

Sarah Rice won the 2014 Ron Pretty and Bruce Dawe poetry prizes, co-won the 2013 Writing Ventures, and 2011 Gwen Harwood awards, and has been shortlisted in numerous others. Her art-book of poetry Those Who Travel (prints Patsy Payne) is held in the NGA and her collection, Fingertip of the Tongue, was published in September by UWAP this year.

Festival of Ideas – is democracy in Australia working?

Discussion, food and music – join us and have your say.

Saturday October 14th  

10.00 – 4.30 pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest

MCH members, government income support and full-time students $30. Non-members $40.00

 CLICK HERE TO BOOK

CLICK HERE FOR PROGRAM

The democratic experiment in countries around the world has been about the free contest of ideas, interests, and groups, along with tolerance for opponents and respect for their legitimacy. But the history of democracy globally is strewn with examples of extremists and demagogues manipulating prejudice, insecurity, and fear in a bid for power. Recent events in the United States of America and Europe suggest these examples are not relegated to history.

So how does Australia fare in this environment? Join us, and have your say as to whether democracy in Australia needs revamping and if so, what might we do about it?

Program covers presentations and discussion on:

  • what people think about our political parties
  • who controls the policy agenda
  • perspectives from different community groups
  • limitation of ideas covered in election campaigns
  • does French President Macron offer new approaches
  • what can we do to increase real democratic engagement.

 

Opportunity, merit and Australian democracy

13 October, 6.30 pm

The Muse Restaurant, East Hotel, 69 Canberra Avenue, Kingston

Dinner $90 per person OR Festival Ticket: 13-14 October Dinner and Day of Ideas, $110 (members) $120 (non-members)

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

Australians have prided themselves in the myth that opportunity is open for all. But the evidence that birth and luck play an outsized role in our lives is overwhelming. So how has the idea of a meritocracy survived for so long?

Join Professor Frank Bongiorno for fine dining at the Muse restaurant. For dinner, wine, and conversation with one of Australia’s most active public intellectuals on the future of opportunity and merit in Australia’s social democracy.

Speaker: Frank Bongiorno is Professor of History at the Australian National University. He is an Australian labour, political and cultural historian. His recent works include The Sex Lives of Australians: A History (2012), and The Eighties: The Decade That Transformed Australia (2015)

North Korea Today and Tomorrow

Monday 9 October 2017, 5.30pm for 6pm 

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest

MCH members, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $5

Non-members $10.00

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

Dr Leonid Petrov is one of Australia’s leading experts on North Korea. In this talk he will summarise the domestic and international policies of Pyongyang and provide several possible scenarios for Korea and the region that include peaceful co-existence, violent unification and even a nuclear Armageddon.

NorthKorea1

Leonid Petrov graduated from the Department of Oriental Studies, St. Petersburg State University in 1994, where he majored in Korean History and Language. In 1994-1996, he worked as interpreter for the South Korean National Soccer Team and participated in the 26th Olympic Games in Atlanta. In 1996-2002, Leonid Petrov worked on a doctoral thesis at the Australian National University. Between 2003 and 2005, Dr. Petrov conducted post-doctoral research at the Academy of Korean Studies in Seongnam and taught Korean History at the Intercultural Institute of California in San Francisco. In 2006-2007, he was Chair of Korean Studies at the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Sciences Po) in Paris. Between 2009 and 2012, Dr. Petrov taught Korean History and Language at the University of Sydney. Currently, he teaches Cross-Cultural Management, Strategic Intelligence and other subjects at the International College of Management in Sydney (ICMS). Starting from 2007, Dr. Petrov has been involved in a number of projects sponsored by the Australian Research Council.

How does Australia decide to go to war – should the Parliament decide?

Speaker : Ernst Wilheim

Tuesday, 19 September – 5.30 for 6pm start. Finishes 7.30.

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle, Forrest.

$5 for MCH members, government income support and full-time students, $10 non-members

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

The decision to go to war is arguably the most important decision any government can make. Yet it is the least regulated of any government decision.

We have all observed the many hours of parliamentary debate and back room negotiation on controversial legislation. Yet Australia can be taken to war on the whim of our Prime Minister.

How can this be?

Lawyers refer to ‘the Royal prerogative’ to go to war.

Is the Royal prerogative the relic of a bygone era? Is it consistent with contemporary values, with the modern perception of the role of the Parliament and the ultimate sovereignty of the people?  How do similar countries deal with the decision to go to the war? What are the alternatives? Is a requirement for prior parliamentary approval feasible? These are some of the issues to be explored.

Ernst Willheim is a Visiting fellow at the College of Law, ANU. Before his formal retirement he was a senior officer of the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department. In that capacity, he has appeared as counsel in the High Court and other appellate courts, lead Australian delegations to international conferences, established and headed the Office of General Counsel and headed other legal policy divisions. Ernst has published widely on public law matters, constitutional law, administrative law, international law, refugee issues and indigenous issues. Ernst is Vice President of Manning Clark House.

 

 

New economic directions

The circular economy project of the European Union is a ground breaking initiative.      Questions are being asked whether mainstream economic policies in Australia are appropriate within a world of climate change impacts and growing inequality.

This forum will look at new economic directions including policies to redistribute income and address the imbalance between capital and labour.

Wednesday 9 August, 2017 – 5.30 for 6pm start. 7pm finish

Tickets – members/concessions $5, non-members $10. Click here to book. 

Venue: Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circuit

Image of David Richardson - Australia Institute

David Richardson, The Australia Institute. David Richardson (BEc, MEc) taught at the University of New England and University of Western Australia. Worked in the Research Service, Parliamentary Library (1979-85 and 1996-2007). During the Hawke/Keating years (1985-1996) worked for Ministers Brian Howe and Sen Nick Bolkus. David commenced at The Australia Institute in 2008.

CarolineLambert

Caroline Lambert is the  First Counsellor of the Delegation to Australia of the European Commission. Since March 2015, Caroline has been the European Union’s Climate and Environment Counsellor in Australia. Caroline worked for five years in the private office of the European Commissioner for Climate Action, Connie Hedegaard, where she advised on financial, trade and taxation matters and adaptation policy. Between 2007 and 2010, Caroline advised Margot Wallström, Vice President of the European Commission in charge of Communication and Interinstitutional Relations and helped design communication campaigns on key European policies.

The future of quality news in Australia – July 12, 2017

Katharine Murphy (Guardian’s political editor) and Caroline Fisher (Asst Prof of Journalism at UC) will deliver a scintillating discussion on the above subject.

Venue – Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmanian Circle, Forrest.

Ticket price $5.00 MHC members, $10 non-members, concessions $5.00

Click here to book

Organiser: Shobha Varkey Ph: 0405 064 176
shobhamvarkey@gmail.com

 

Invidious Choices – naval war in the Pacific 1914

Speaker: Lieutenant Commander Desmond Woods
RANR Research Officer – Sea Power Centre – Australia – Department of Defence
Thursday 6 July 2017 at 6:00pm
Venue : Manning Clark House. 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest.
War in the Indo Pacific oceans and HMAS Australia in 1914 – Invidious Choices and catastrophe at Coronel and how the build up occurred and the details behind the scenes of how naval war began on this occasion and ended.
Ticket price $5.00 for MHC members, $10.00 for non-members

Click here to book

Organiser : Shobha Varkey
Ph: 0405064176