Monthly Archives: August 2018

Australia’s Intelligence Agencies and the Brave New World of Home Affairs: how we got there and how it matters

Wednesday 19 September at 5.30 for 6pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/XPAP

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In December 2017 the Department of Home Affairs was created, assuming many functions from the Attorney General’s Department, including national security policy and coordination, criminal law and law enforcement.

The functions it took over from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet included cyber- and counter terrorism policy coordination, and the new department absorbed the whole of the former Department of Immigration and Border Protection.

Professor Blaxland will discuss the implications of these administrative re-arrangements for Australia’s intelligence agencies.

About the speaker:  John Blaxland is Professor of International Security and Intelligence Studies at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, ANU. He is a lead author in the three-volume official history of ASIO, having authored Volume II, The Protest Years, 1963-75 (Allen & Unwin 2015), and co-authored The Secret Cold War, 1975-89 (2016).  John has also published works on the intervention in East Timor, the Australian Army, and on counterinsurgency. He makes regular appearances in the print and electronic media as a commentator on intelligence and security matters.

 

 

The problem of justice – Prosecuting Japanese for War Crimes after the Second World War

22 August 5.30 for 6pm

Manning Clark House, 11 Tasmania Circle Forrest

MCH members $5, concession (Government Support) and full-time students $10

Non-members $15.00

Booking: https://www.trybooking.com/WYXH

japanese-wark-crimes.jpg

After the Second World War in the Asia and the Pacific, the victorious Allied powers prosecuted thousands of Japanese military personnel for war crimes.

The scale of atrocities during the war had been remarkable, but pinning responsibility on specific individuals proved to be more difficult than expected. As a result, some of the justice was rough and ready.

About the speaker: Robert Cribb is Professor of Asian History at the Australian National University. His research focuses on Indonesia, especially issues of national identity, mass violence, environmental politics and historical geography. He has also researched the histories of Japan, Mongolia, Korea and Myanmar. His most recent book, with Sandra Wilson, Beatrice Trefalt and Dean Aszkielowicz, is Japanese War Criminals: the politics of Justice after the Second World War (Columbia 2017), which won the New South Wales Premier’s History Award in the General History category. He is also author of Wild Man from Borneo: a cultural history of the orangutan (Hawai’i 2014, with Helen Gilbert and Helen Tiffin) and the Historical Atlas of Indonesia (Curzon 2000). He is currently working with Sandra Wilson to explain Japanese war crimes in Southeast Asia during the Second World War.